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Accident case study, "final approach"

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Richard Wyeroski, Jan 14, 2018.

  1. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    An accident that happened and all we could ask is why. Maybe ATC could have helped more? Too many bad decision by the pilot.



    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>MORE<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
     
  2. Lord Leighton

    Lord Leighton Hangar Gold Member I

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    I remember that one.
     
  3. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    Go no go decision? Night, low IFR, Single engine, Equipment problems, Pilot experience? What decision. Based on the FAA senerio based training and risk Managment training, what would the decision to make this flight be?

    Unfortunately the result was loss of life, a doctor and another fatal added to the accident rate.....We all are effected.
     
  4. Rotorruss

    Rotorruss Hangar Silver Member III

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    ...the subjective SMS will never fix the human factors in decision making. The agency is fooling everyone into believing that everyone will come to the same conclusion based on the same facts. I'd bet when you pose this scenario to a group of people, the answers will vary and get a few that would make the "go" decision. Even putting them in a "box" to fly the profile wouldn't change their mind. How many people "crash" a "box" every day?
     
  5. Lord Leighton

    Lord Leighton Hangar Gold Member I

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    Well they're on the hotline to their companies should anything amiss happen then the aircraft manufacturer if it gets to that too
    .
     
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  6. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    Nothing will change primarily because there is no way that I know of to teach common sense!
     
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  7. Lord Leighton

    Lord Leighton Hangar Gold Member I

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    $$$$$$$$$$$ replaces common sense in too many cases.
     
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  8. Rotorruss

    Rotorruss Hangar Silver Member III

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    ...the one thing I see more often is the fear of declaring an emergency or asking for assistance. A close second is pressing the "completing the flight as planned" and not having an alternative plan. Then there's the not being able to stick to a plan once one is made.

    Now, I was never bashful in asking for help when I needed it. Was never asked to file a report other then maybe calling the tower later. I was never afraid of the agency when I was flying the line.

    I would rather be bothered by filling out paperwork or renting a car then being a crash test dummy. If people would think, "it could happen to me", and build the safety cushion from a "no go" perspective, we might see a few less crashes.

    If people don't want to police themselves, the government will. We all know how that ends up.
     
  9. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    .....the FAA is concerned (I know) with the innocents on the ground that sometimes are in harms way, when an aircraft crashes. I pilot has to consider if he is involved in an accident that no one else is hurt besides himself. Poor decision making and taking chances should not be tolerated.
     
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  10. Rotorruss

    Rotorruss Hangar Silver Member III

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    ...the concern is somewhat subjective in the administration of justice for an infraction of the rules. There is no consistency in sanctions. The scales of justice is a pendulum that the agency uses for measuring a just means to the end. Some would even say that the agency uses a dart board to administer justice.

    They claim that it's all about the volunteering of the information in an infraction. Chances are, that a warning or a letter of correction will be issued for volunteering the information of the infraction. Try hiding it or not be proactive in information sharing, you are at the mercy of the legal system.

    So, going back to this thread. Some fear of getting into trouble and being second guessed for things that don't go as planned. Some even deny that there's a problem.

    This case, the pilot ran out of fuel. The same thing has happened in the airlines. The time left in the tanks is easily forgotten when another situation is being worked no matter the number of crew.
     
  11. Richard Wyeroski

    Richard Wyeroski Hangar Gold Member I

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    .....the fact is that this accident is common!.....it happens to often when a pilot decides to take the risks involved and then the risks get out of hand. This pilot had 600 hours with a private certificate and an instrument rating. It was even mentioned that he had all of 80 hours of instrument time. Looking at the risks.....two stick out.....night and low IFR.
     
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  12. Rotorruss

    Rotorruss Hangar Silver Member III

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    ...not going to disagree with you one bit...the preliminary report for the FL C340 crash is out and posted on another thread. Hopefully, we will have leadership coming soon to help with this systemic problem.

    "Drain the Swamp" and improve the safety culture.
     

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